Is there a job in ICT for me?

This infographic made by Liberty Global together with Telecentre Europe addresses young Europeans, unemployed and job seekers. It aims at raising their awareness about the required digital skills in order to access ICT careers.

Is There a Job in ICT for me?

High Unemployment across Europe

» In January 2014, in the European Union there were :

  • 26 million people unemployed
  • Total unemployment 10.8%
  • Youth unemployment (age 15-24)is at  23.4%
  • Youth unemployment in Greece and Spain is above 50 %

But ICT jobs are in demand!

While people struggle to find jobs, it is estimated that there will be 913,000 unfilled ICT jobs by 2020. This estimate was put forward by the Grand Coalition for Digital Jobs- an initiative led by the European Commission that wishes to get businesses and education providers , public and private actors to take action attracting young people into ICT careers but alos help unemployed retrain with the new skills needed.  The goal is increase the supply of ICT practitioners by 2015, a win-win situation for job seekers and employers needing skilled people!

Why the gap?

In 2006 ICT graduates peaked at 127,000 but by 2011 fewer people were training : 115,000.
This means  9.5% fewer ICT  graduates since  2006.

So what kind of ICT jobs are out there?

Percentage of ICT workforce in 2012

Projected vacancies in 2020

Jobs like

Management, architecture and analysis*

20%

283,000

• Web Analysts
• ICT service managers
• Management and organization analysts
• Systems analysts
• IT Business Analysts

ICT professionals

46%

630,000

• Digital Web designers
• Software developers/architects
• Web & multimedia developers
• Applications programmers
• Computer network professionals
• Web entrepreneurs

ICT technicians

34%

• Technology operations technicians,
• User support technicians
• Systems technicians
• Web technicians

How much could I get paid?

ICT skills are valuable and pay is competitive. Salaries depend on country, gender, age, education level, and the type of job. Pay is generally higher at bigger companies, and contractors can often earn more than permanent employees. Salaries also go up for employees who have worked at a company for a long time. Average monthly earnings (Euro) in 2010, before tax:

  • For someone starting a new job as a permanent employee
  • In a mid-size company (250-499 employees)
  • With tertiary education
  • By average weekly working hours per country:

Average earnings across all sectors (highest to lowest)

22-year-old ICT professional

22-year-old technician / associate professional

35-year-old manager

Denmark

4654

4269

6712

Sweden

3437

3042

4859

Luxembourg

4147

3551

6765

Belgium

3775

3385

5287

Finland

3568

2912

5221

Ireland

3202

2793

4696

France

3129

2474

3942

Netherlands

3049

2740

4189

Germany

3875

3635

5434

UK

3911

2888

4515

Italy

2822

2200

4788

Austria

3659

3291

5166

Malta

2046

1653

2323

Spain

2188

1794

3172

Cyprus

2232

1835

3601

Slovenia

2181

1812

3412

Portugal

1934

1491

2941

Estonia

1402

1136

1820

Czech Republic

1590

1455

2186

Slovakia

1402

1183

1887

Hungary

1041

986

1567

Poland

1186

965

1732

Latvia

871

743

1068

Lithuania

686

587

898

Romania

673

567

1041

Bulgaria

574

484

810

What about the skills?

The skills needed can be divided into a number of categories depending on what the person wants to achieve. Those aiming to work as ICT professionals will need to find out what skills are currently in demand, for example related to programming languages and database tools. These are very specific and depend on the profile a company is looking for at any given moment.
At another level, but also important for any work in the knowledge economy – not only in the ICT field, job seekers can get better chances of recruitment when they have general digital competences (i.e. content creation, digital communication, problem solving, software and online tools use in the office environment etc). Skills that relate to managerial or financial planning, administration and management are key to getting ahead in any profession and the same applies to ICT sector. Of great importance, and often overlooked, are the non-technical or so called soft skills related to communication, team-work, customer service, innovation and creativity.

What skills do I need?

Types of skills

Where can I get these skills?

Where to get these skills

The Grand Coalition for Digital Jobs

Telecentre Europe is supported by Liberty Global to organize Get Online Week, a digital empowerment campaign embedded into eSkills for Jobs. Both initiatives support the European Commission’s Grand Coalition for Digital Jobs, planning to fill the digital skills gap by attracting more young people to ICT careers, boosting education and training and facilitating access to digital opportunities.

References